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Written by admin. Posted on 23 November 2011.
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We hope you find them helpful

 

Nine Times Table:

For nines we’ll want to use our “finger calculator“.

 

    • Hold up your hands in front of you, palms facing away from you with thumbs together in the middle;

 

    • Your fngers are then numbered 1 to 10 from left to right i.e. with your left pinky being number 1 and your right pinky being 10;

 

We'll now use an example to demonstrate how to use the “calculator”:

 

Example: 9 x 3

You will need to put your third finger down i.e. the middle finger on your left hand. Do you notice you have 2 fingers before the “hidden” finger (i.e. your left pinky and ring finger) and 7 fingers after (i.e. your left pointer and thumb and all 5 right fingers). Now, write these numbers down: 27

 

Therefore 9 x 3 = 27

 

Now, try it for a couple of sums, example:

9 x 5 = 45

9 x 9 = 81

9 x 7 = 63

 

Eleven Times Table:
Elevens are one of the easiest times table once you know the trick, all you need to do is repeat the number by which eleven is multiplied. Have a look at the following examples:

 

11 x 2 = 22

11 x 4 = 44

11 x 7 = 77

 

Five & Ten Times Tables:

These two are the easiest of the lot!

 

For Tens, all we do is put a zero behind the number by which we are multiplying.

 

i.e. 10 x 4 = 40 and 10 x 11 = 110 and 10 x 9 = 90

 

For Fives, all we need to remember is that the answer either ends with a 5 or a zero. Also, we know that five is half of ten, so we start by working it out for 10 and then halve the answer.

 

Example: 5 x 4

First we work out for 10, i.e. 10 x 4 = 40, now halve that i.e. half 40 = 20

Therefore 5 x 4 = 20

 

Have a look at these examples:

10 x 6 = 60 therefore 5 x 6 = 30

10 x 9 = 90 therefore 5 x 9 = 45

10 x 12 = 120 therefore 5 x 12 = 60

 

Four & Eight Times Table:
Fours and Eights can seem a bit daunting, but not if you can remember your Twos. We know that four is double two and eight is double four. This is important as it can help you figure out your four and eight times table.

 

Let’s look at an example to help demonstrate the point:

 

Say we have a question 4 x 6, we start by working it out for 2 first:

 

    • 2 x 6 = 12

 

    • now, double this answer i.e. double 12 = 24

 

Therefore, 4 x 6 = 24

 

If we now double this answer again, we will get the answer for 8 x 6.

i.e. double 24 = 48

 

Therefore 8 x 6 = 48

 

So, you can see that we start with our twos and can work our way through to the fours and the eights.

 

Here are a few examples:

2 x 5 = 10 therefore 4 x 5 = 20 therefore 8 x 5 = 40

2 x 7 = 14 therefore 4 x 7 = 28 therefore 8 x 7 = 56

2 x 10 = 20 therefore 4 x 10 = 40 therefore 8 x 10 = 80

 

Six & Twelve Times Table:
Our Sixes and Twelves follow the exact same pattern as we just saw with the Fours and Eights, however they are attached to the base of Three. We know that six is double three and twelve is double six, therefore, we start by working the sum out for three, and then double it to get six, etc…

 

Let’s look at an example to demonstrate the point:

 

Say we have a question 6 x 3, we start by working it out for 3 first:

 

    • 3 x 3 = 9

 

    • now, double this answer i.e. double 9 = 18

 

Therefore, 6 x 3 = 18

 

If we now double this answer again, we will get the answer for 12 x 3.

i.e. double 18 = 36

 

Therefore 12 x 3 = 36

 

So, you can see a similar pattern to what we just learnt with the twos, fours and eights.

 

Have a look at a few more examples:

3 x 2 = 6 therefore 6 x 2 = 12 therefore 12 x 2 = 24

3 x 8 = 24 therefore 6 x 8 = 48 therefore 12 x 8 = 96

3 x 10 = 30 therefore 6 x 10 = 60 therefore 12 x 10 = 120

 

We therefore have tricks to helps us work out 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 times tables, which leaves us to remember only 2, 3, and 7.

 

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